Following our in-depth review of the ESAB Sentinel last month, we wanted to take a fresh look at some of the new improvements Miller has been adding to their helmets. In particular, their ClearLight technology has now been upgraded and enhanced with the introduction of new ClearLight 2.0.

While ClearLight 2.0 is being actively incorporated into Miller’s line of auto-darkening helmets, we’ll also be taking a deep dive into the Miller Digital Infinity helmets to see how well they stand up to the competition in 2022.

 

ClearLight 2.0

The jump from traditional auto-darkening helmets to Miller’s ClearLight technology was huge. We did a complete breakdown of it here, but the main takeaway is this: No more monotone, green tint. For the first time in the history of auto-darkening helmets, you could really see colors and the contrast between nuanced details in your weld puddle.

ClearLight 2.0 goes even further to add more colors and contrast, increasing clarity. This also directly affects eye fatigue, allowing you to weld under your hood longer, as your eyes aren’t having to strain to make out what’s in front of you.

So is ClearLight 2.0 enough of a change to upgrade your lens? For most professional welders who spend several hours each day under a hood, it’s definitely an addition you’ll want to take advantage of. But if you’re looking for a real jaw-dropping improvement, it’d be best to pair ClearLight 2.0 with a new Digital Infinity helmet. Here’s why:

 

Miller’s Digital Infinity Helmets

While Miller produces several lines of helmets, their Digital Infinity series has become their most impressive. These hoods offer something that no other consumer auto-darkening helmet has been able to match: a massive viewing area. 

With a 13.4 square inch display, the Infinity is a completely different experience than what you’re probably used to. After being able to see that much, any other helmet feels like you’re wearing one of those medieval jousting helmets.

The Infinity helmet features four different viewing modes: weld, cut, grind and X-Mode. While the first three are fairly standard, X-Mode is a unique capability that senses the electromagnetic pulse from the welding arc, rather than the light it produces. When welding outside on sunny days, the light can trick an auto-darkening helmet into going dark when you’re not welding. This becomes incredibly annoying, requiring you to keep lifting up your hood—basically ruining the main benefit of why you got an auto-darkening helmet in the first place.

X-Mode is a great way to remedy this problem. Since it causes the sensors to only react to the pulse from the arc and not the light from the sun, the Digital Infinity works great while welding on even the brightest days of the year.

 

Little Things Adding Up

While the viewing area, clarity and four different modes are the main features of Infinity helmets, there are a lot of smaller additions that really add up. For instance, the Infinity helmet has a solar panel. You’ll still have to charge an Infinity helmet, but the solar panel helps its battery last longer.

The headband has also been improved over the years for a more secure, comfortable fit. Almost every aspect can be adjusted, allowing the headgear to be tweaked exactly to your liking. The front lens cover is also incredibly easy to change. Some helmets basically require you to take the whole thing apart to change the lens cover. With the Infinity, it can literally be done in 30 seconds.

 

All of these benefits, plus the addition of ClearLight 2.0, make the Miller Digital Infinity one of the best helmets you can buy. Just make sure you check with Welding Supplies from IOC first. When you join our free loyalty program, you’ll be able to get the best prices and service on the web. See for yourself here.